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ABOUT KODálY

Bacon, Denise. Hold Fast to Dreams: Writings Inspired by Zoltán Kodály. Wellesley, Massachusetts: Kodály Center of America, 1993.

Barron, John. A Selected Bibliography of the Kodály Concept of Music Education (Kodály Institute of Canada Monograph II). Willowdale, Ontario: The Avondale Press, 1979.

Bónis, Ferenc (Ed.). The Selected Writings of Zoltán Kodály. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1974.

Dobszay, László. After Kodály: Reflections on Music Education. Kecskemét: Zoltán Kodály Pedagogical Institute of Music, 1991.

Eösze, László. Zoltán Kodály: His Life and Work (trans. István Farkas and Gyula Gyulás). Budapest: Corvina, 1962.

Eösze, László. Zoltán Kodály: His Life in Pictures and Documents. Budapest: Corvina, 1982.

Johnston, Richard (Ed.). Kodály and Education III. Zoltán Kodály in North America (Kodály Institute of Canada Monograph III). Willowdale, Ontario: The Avondale Press, 1986.

Hein, Mary Alice. The Legacy of Zoltán Kodály: An Oral History Perspective. Budapest: International Kodály Society.

Kaplan, Barbara (Ed.). The Kodály Concept: A Bibliography for Music Education. Whitewater, Wisconsin: Organization of American Kodály Educators, 1985.

Strong, Alan D. (Ed.). Who Was Kodály? (OAKE Monograph Series No. 1), Organization of American Kodály Educators, 1992.

Szögi, Ágnes. Kodály’s Music Educational Concept in the International Practice: A Selected Bibliography from the Collection of the Kodály Institute. Kecskemét: Zoltán Kodály Pedagogical Institute of Music, 1993.

Vikár, László. Reflections on Kodály. Budapest: International Kodály Society, 1985.

Weiss, Paul. Kodály and Education I. Kodály – Questions of Adaptation and Pedagogy of Rhythm (Kodály Institute of Canada Monograph I). Willowdale, Ontario: The Avondale Press, 1977.

BY KODály

Educational Music and Singing Exercises written by Zoltán Kodály
(published by Boosey & Hawkes)

Fifteen Two-part Exercises, 1941
Bicinia Hungarica I-IV, 1937-42
Let Us Sing Correctly, 1941
333 Elementary Exercises, 1943
Pentatonic Music I-IV, 1945-48
33 Two-Part Exercises, 1954
44 Two-Part Exercises, 1954
55 Two-Part Exercises, 1954Tricinia, 1954
Epigrams, 1954
24 Little Canons on the Black Keys, 1957
Fifty Nursery Songs, 1961
66 Two-Part Exercises, 1962
22 Two-Part Exercises, 1964
77 Two-Part Exercises, 1966 Pedagogical Resources


singing exercises written by zoltan KODály
(published by Boosey & Hawkes)

Fifteen Two-part Exercises, 1941
Bicinia Hungarica I-IV, 1937-42
Let Us Sing Correctly, 1941
333 Elementary Exercises, 1943
Pentatonic Music I-IV, 1945-48
33 Two-Part Exercises, 1954
44 Two-Part Exercises, 1954
55 Two-Part Exercises, 1954Tricinia, 1954
Epigrams, 1954
24 Little Canons on the Black Keys, 1957
Fifty Nursery Songs, 1961
66 Two-Part Exercises, 1962
22 Two-Part Exercises, 1964
77 Two-Part Exercises, 1966 Pedagogical Resources


 

canadian Regional song collections

Borlase, Tim. Songs of Labrador. Fredericton, New Brunswick: Goose Lane Editions, 1993.

Cass-Beggs, Barbara. Eight Songs of Saskatchewan. Toronto: Canadian Music Sales, 1963.

Creighton, Helen. Folksongs from Southern New Brunswick. Ottawa: National Museum of Canada, 1971.

_____. Maritime Folk Songs. Toronto: Ryerson, 1962 (reprinted Breakwater, 1979).

_____. Songs and Ballads from Nova Scotia. Toronto: Dent, 1932 (reprinted Dover, 1979).

Creighton, Helen and Calum MacLeod. Gaelic Songs in Nova Scotia. Ottawa: National Museum of Canada, 1964.

Creighton, Helen and Doreen H. Senior. Traditional Songs from Nova Scotia. Toronto: Ryerson, 1950.

Doyle, Gerald S. Old-Time Songs and Poetry of Newfoundland. St. John’s, Newfoundland: Gerald S. Doyle Ltd., 1927, 1940, 1955, 1966, 1978.

Fowke, Edith. Lumbering Songs from the Northern Woods. Toronto: New Canada Publications, 1985.

_____. Traditional Singers and Songs from Ontario. Hatboro, Pennsylvania: Folklore Associates, 1965.

Fowke, Edith and Richard Johnston. Chansons de Québec/Folk Songs of Quebec. Waterloo, Ontario:Waterloo Music, 1957.

Gledhill, Christopher. Folk Songs of Prince Edward Island. Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island: Square Deal, 1973.

Greenleaf, Elisabeth B. and Grace Y. Mansfield. Ballads and Sea Songs of Newfoundland. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1933 (reprinted Folklore Associates, 1968).

Karpeles, Maud. Folk Songs from Newfoundland. London: Faber and Faber, 1971.

Leach, MacEdward. Folk Ballads and Songs of the Lower Labrador Coast. Ottawa: National Museum of Canada, 1965.

Lehr, Genevieve (Ed.). Come and I Will Sing You: a Newfoundland Songbook. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1985.

Mackenzie, W. Roy. Ballads and Sea Songs from Nova Scotia. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1933 (reprinted Folklore Associates, 1963).

Manny, Louise and James Reginald Wilson. Songs of Miramichi. Fredericton, New Brunswick: Brunswick Press, 1968.

Mills, Alan. Favourite Songs of Newfoundland. Toronto: BMI Canada, 1958.

O’Donnell, John. Men of the Deeps. Waterloo, Ontario: Waterloo Music, 1975.

Peacock, Kenneth. Songs of the Newfoundland Outports, 3 Vols. Ottawa: National Museum of Canada, 1965.

Pottie, Kaye and Vernon Ellis. Folksongs of the Maritimes from the Collections of Helen Creighton and Other Distinguished Maritime Folklorists. Halifax, Nova Scotia: Formac Publishing, 1992.

Ryan, Shannon and Larry Small. Haulin’ Rope and Gaff: Songs and Poetry in the History of the Newfoundland Seal Fishery. St. John’s, Newfoundland: Breakwater, 1978.

Thomas, Philip J. Songs of the Pacific Northwest. North Vancouver, British Columbia: Hancock House, 1979.


Vocal/choral development

Bartle, Jean Ashworth. Lifeline for Children’s Choir Directors. Toronto: Gordon V. Thompson, 1988.

Cooksey, John M. Working with the Adolescent Voice. St. Louis, Missouri: Concordia Publishing House, 1992.

Ehmann, Wilhelm, and Haasemann, Frauke. Voice Building for Choirs. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Hinshaw, 1982.

Haasemann, Frauke and James M. Jordan. Group Vocal Technique. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Hinshaw, 1991.

Kemp, Helen. Helen Kemp on Junior Choirs. Dayton, Ohio: Lorenz, 1962.

_____. Hymns Plus for Junior Choristers. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Hinshaw, 1980.

_____. Of Primary Importance. Garland, Texas: Choristers Guild, 1989.

_____. Of Primary Importance II. Garland, Texas: Choristers Guild, 1991.

Marshall, Madeline. The Singers’ Manual of English Diction. New York: Schirmer, 1991.

McRae, Shirley. Directing the Children’s Choir: A Comprehensive Survey. New York: Schirmer, 1991.

Phillips, Kenneth. Teaching Kids to Sing. Toronto: Maxwell Macmillan Canada, 1992.

Pohjola, Erkki, and Matti Tuomisto. Tapiola Sound. Ft. Lauderdale, Florida: Walton Music, 1993.

Rao, Doreen. Choral Music Experience, Volumes 1-5. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1987.

_____. Choral Music for Children. Reston, Virginia: MENC, 1990.

_____. We Will Sing!. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1994.

Swears, Linda. Teaching the Elementary School Chorus. West Nyack, New York: Parker, 1985.


Songs and rhymes

Antal, Molnár. Classical Canons. Toronto: Boosey & Hawkes, 1955.

Birkenshaw, Lois. Music for Fun, Music for Learning. Toronto: Holt, Rinehart, 1977.

Birkenshaw-Fleming, Lois. Come on Everybody, Let’s Sing! Toronto: Gordon V. Thompson, 1989.

Bradford, Louise Larkins. Sing It Yourself – 220 Pentatonic American Folk Songs. Sherman Oaks, California: Alfred Publishing, 1978.

Brocklehurst, Brian. Pentatonic Song Book. London: Schott, 1968.

_____ Second Pentatonic Song Book. London: Schott, 1976.

Bronner, Simon. American Children’s Folklore: A Book of Rhymes, Games, Jokes, Stories, Secret Languages, Beliefs and Camp Legends. Little Rock, Arkansas: August House, 1988.

Chase, Richard. Singing Games and Playparty Games. New York: Dover, 1967 (1949).

Choksy, Lois. The Kodály Context: Creating an Environment for Musical Learning. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1981.

_____. The Kodály Method: Comprehensive Music Education from Infant to Adult, Second Edition. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1987.

_____. Teaching Music Effectively in the Elementary School. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Halll, 1991.

Choksy, Lois and David Brummitt. 120 Singing Games and Dances for Elementary Schools. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1987.

Dale, Ralph Alan. Music in the Round. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1965.

Delamar, Gloria T. Rounds Re-Sounding: Circular Music for Voices and Instruments (An Eight-Century Reference. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company.

_____. Children’s Counting-Out Rhymes, Fingerplays, Jump-Rope and Bounce-Ball Chants and Other Rhythms: A Comprehensive English-Language Reference. Jefferson, N.C.:, 1983.

Erdei, Peter. 150 American Folk Songs to Sing, Read and Play. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1974.

Feierabend, John. Music for Little People. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1989.
_____. Music for Very Little People. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1986.

Forrai, Katalin and Jean Sinor. Music in Preschool. Budapest: Corvina, 1988.

Fowke, Edith. Sally Go Round the Sun: 300 Songs, Rhymes, and Games of Canadian Children. Toronto:McClelland and Stewart, 1969.

_____. Ring Around the Moon: 200 Songs, Tongue Twisters, Riddles and Rhymes of Canadian Children. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1977.

Fulton, Eleanor and Pat Smith. Let’s Slice the Ice: A Collection of Black Children’s Ring Games and Chants. Saint Louis, Mo.: Magnamusic-Baton, 1978.

Johnston, Richard. Folk Songs North America Sings. Toronto: Kerby, 1984.
Julliard Repertory Library. Cincinnati, Ohio: Canyon Press, 1970.

Kenney, Maureen. Circle Round the Zero: Play Chants & Singing Games of City Children. Saint Louis, Mo.: Magnamusic-Baton, 1983.

Kersey, Robert E. Just Five. Melville, New York: Belwin-Mills, 1972.

_____. Just Five Plus Two. Melville, New York: Belwin-Mills, 1975.

Langstaff, Nancy and John. The Christmas Revels Songbook. Boston: Revels Inc., 1985

Libana. A Circle is Cast: Rounds, Chants and Songs for Celebration and Ritual. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Libana, 1986.

_____. Fire Within: Magical and Contemplative Rounds and Songs from Around the World. Durham, N.C.:Ladyslipper, 1990.

Locke, Eleanor G. Sail Away: 155 American Folk Songs to Sing, Read and Play. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1988.

Lowe, Helenclair (Ed.). The Choristers’ Round Book: A Collection of Early American Rounds. Dallas, Texas: Choristers Guild, 1976.

Newell, William Wells. Games and Songs of American Children. New York: Dover, 1963 (1883).

Opie, Iona & Peter. The Oxford Nursery Rhyme Book. London: Oxford University Press, 1987.

_____. The Singing Game. London: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Perinchief. Robert. Honor Your Partner Songs. Whitewater, Wisconsin: Perry Publications, 1982.

Rounds for Children. New York: Amsco Publications, 1986.

Weikart, Phyllis S. Movement Plus Music: Activities for Children Ages 3 to 7. Ypsilanti, Michigan:High/Scope Press, 1985.

_____. Movement Plus Rhymes, Songs and Singing Games. Ypsilanti, Michigan: High/Scope Press, 1988.

_____. Round the Circle: Key Experiences in Movement for Children Ages 3 to 5. Ypsilanti, Michigan:High/Scope Press, 1987.

_____. Teaching Movement & Dance: A Sequential Approach to Rhythmic Movement. Ypsilanti, Michigan: High/Scope Press, 1982.

Wood, Donna. Move, Sing, Listen, Play. Toronto: Gordon V. Thompson, 1982.


Songs as storybooks

Adams, Pam. This Old Man. Purton Wilts, England: Child’s Play Ltd., 1974. Size and illustrations are very appropriate for early years children. Song not included.

Bogart, Jo Ellen & Barbara Reid (illus). Gifts. Toronto: Scholastic Canada Ltd., 1994. While not based on a folk song, this tuneful story with its AMAZING plasticine illustrations by artist Barbara Reid is a wonderful addition to any collection of storybooks. The story traces the relationship of a grandmother and granddaughter through the years. There is also a tape available for purchase from Scholastic. While the tape is a tad ‘cheesy’, the students enjoy the synthesized accompaniment with the children singing on the tape. A lively addition to any collection. Song not included.

Brandenburg, Aliki. Hush Little Baby. Englewood Cliffs, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1968. Works very well. Interesting illustrations. Song included.

Carter, David A. If You’re Happy and You Know It. New York: Scholastic Inc., 1997. The bright and cheery appearance of this pop-up book makes it a favourite of all students. Song included.

Christella, Eileen. Five Little Monkeys Sitting in a Tree. New York: Clarion Books, 1991. Students enjoy the humour in this presentation of the traditional chant. We use this choral speaking opportunity to tell the story with great drama and expression in our voices. Rhythm not included.

De Paola, Tomie. The Friendly Beasts. (an old English Christmas carol) New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1981. Works well. Composition of the illustration explained. Song included.

Duke, Kate. Tingalayo. New York: Crown, 1993. My grade one students love to sing this song. Best use is in the early years and early primary years. Song included.

Hill, Eric. Nursery Rhymes Peek-a-Book. London, England: Puffin Books, 1982. The large print and use of primary colours in the illustrations makes this a useful collection of rhymes for use with early years students. They can read along with you and enjoy discovering what is under the flap.

Hale, Sarah Josepha & Tomie dePaola (illus.). Mary Had a Little Lamb. New York: Holiday House, 1984. This famous 19th Century rhyme, with all its 7 verses, is illustrated by Tomie dePaola in usual attractive fashion. The history of the rhyme and its author given. Song included.

Halpern, Shari. What Shall We Do When We All Go Out? New York: North-South Books, 1995. The large size of the book and the use of collages of different types of paper painted with acrylics and watercolours, and colour photocopies of pieces of fabric, catch the eye of the early years student. The repetitive melody has the children singing along in no time. Song included.

Harrison, Ted. O Canada. Toronto: Kids Can Press, 1992. A work of art! Each region of Canada is profiled, in text and art, in this bilingual presentation of our national anthem. I use this book every autumn to review the musical singing of ‘O Canada’, in English and French. Then, each of the school choirs record a performance of the anthem for use during opening exercises. Piano accompaniment (in Eb) included.

Hays, Michael. (text by Pete Seeger) Abiyoyo. New York: Aladdin Books, Macmillan Publishing Company, 1994. Based on an African-American folk story. Pete Seeger also tells and sings this story on the CD “Abiyoyo and Other Story Songs for Children”, Smithsonian/Folkways SF 45001. Seeger is very credible and tells the story in a charming manner. Song included.

Jeffers, Susan. Silent Night. USA: Dutton Children’s Books, 1984. Charming illustrations accompany the retelling of the classic hymn telling the story of the Nativity. The large size of the book is a plus. Song included.

Keats, Ezra Jack. Over in the Meadow. New York: Scholastic Inc., 1971. Wonderful illustrations. Works very well. Song not included.

Kovalski, Maryann. Jingle Bells. Markham, Ontario: Fitzhenry & Whiteside Ltd., 1998. This is a reissue under the ‘First Flight’ reading series umbrella. The original text has been altered for young readers and, although sometimes plodding for classroom use, is a wonderful addition to any seasonal collection. The smallish size of the book can also be a concern, but my students enjoy the antics of Grandma and her two granddaughters. (These charming characters are also featured in “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” and “The Wheels on the Bus”) Song not included.

Kovalski, Maryann. Take Me Out to the Ball Game. Toronto: Scholastic Canada Inc., 1992. A very Canadian take on an old favourite. Grandma and her two granddaughters attend a baseball game and root for the home team, which looks an awful lot like the Blue Jays! A favourite, especially with young Blue Jays fans. Song included.

Kovalski, Maryann. The Wheels on the Bus. Toronto: Kids Can Press, 1987. A charming presentation of the traditional song featuring Grandma and her granddaughters on a shopping spree. A favourite of the early years and early primary students. Song included in the middle of the book.

Langstaff, John & Nancy Winslow Parker (illlus.). Oh, A-Hunting We Will Go. New York: Aladdin Books, 1991. Charming and humorous illustrations and clever additional verses make this one of the oft-requested books of primary and early junior classes. Students also enjoy making up their own verses and creating the illustrations. Song included.

McCrae, John (poem), Linda Granfield (history) & Janet Wilson (illus.). In Flanders Fields. Toronto: Stoddart Kids, 1996. I use this wonderful resource in preparation for Remembrance Day. This historical information is excellent and the paintings are very moving. I use it in conjunction with Alexander Tilley’s melody of the poem. The performance I prefer is with the Amabile Youth Singers of London, Ontario. (We often sing this song during our school Remembrance Day observance.) I do not use this book with any primary class and prepare my junior classes before we use it. The students are often very moved by the experience, by the illustrations, text and the music.

McCue, Lisa. Jingle Bell Mice. USA.: Troll Communications L.L.C., 1997. The illustrations of animals cavorting in the snow bring smiles to the faces of the children, especially the younger ones, who enjoy the humour of a squirrel pulling mice in a sleigh. Song included.

Muller, Robin & Suzanne Duranceau (illus.). Hickory, Dickory, Dock. Richmond Hill, Ontario: Scholastic Canada Ltd., 1992. Very clever adaptation of the traditional chant. Great for reinforcing 6/8 time.

Muller, Robin. Row, Row, Row Your Boat. Toronto: Scholastic Canada Ltd., 1993. A clever adaptation of a camp-fire mainstay. The story is delightfully silly and the illustrations match the text! A favourite for all ages to enjoy – with a surprise ending! Song not included.

Peek, Merle. Mary Wore Her Red Dress. New York: Clarion Books, 1985. One of the absolute mainstays of my collection. Song included. A ‘must have’.

Rayner, Shoo. Hey Diddle Diddle and other Mother Goose Rhymes. London, England: Puffin Books, 1995. A bright and fun lift-the-flap book useful for reinforcing traditional rhymes with early years students.

Reid, Barbara. Two by Two. Toronto: Scholastic Canada Ltd., 1992. Reid’s amazing plasticine pictures add a great deal to the retelling of the biblical story of Noah and the ark. The familiar call and response melody adds to the fun. In some school settings, the presentation of the book will need to be carefully set up. I think that a tape is available for purchase from Scholastic. Song included.

Rosen, Michael & Helen Oxenbury (illus.). We’re Going on a Bear Hunt. London, England: Walker Books Ltd., 1989. This presentation of the summer camp tale provides a wonderful opportunity for voice exploration. Late primary and all junior students enjoy this adventure.

Slavin, Bill. The Cat Came Back. Toronto: Kids Can Press Ltd., 1992. Song included. The all-time favourite of my junior classes. Song included. A ‘must have’. Older students will enjoy the National Film Board of Canada’s satirical, and award-winning animated ‘short’ of this song. (Use at your discretion.)

Spier, Peter. London Bridge is Falling Down. Garden City, New York: Doubleday, 1967. Very clever illustrations. Works very well. A detailed history of this bridge is included. Song included.

Spier, Peter. The Fox Went Out on a Chilly NightGarden City, New York: Doubleday, 1961. Wonderful illustrations. Works well. The children enjoy this song. Song included.

Sweet, Melissa. Fiddle-I-Fee. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1992. Colourful illustrations. Best for use in primary classes. Song included. (Notation is somewhat ‘straight’. I tend to liven it up a bit.)

Theobalds, Prue. The Teddy Bears’ Picnic. St. Catharines, Ontario: Vanwell Publishing Ltd., 1987. Charming for use in early years and early primary classes. Song not included.

Trapani, Iza. The Itsy Bitsy Spider. Boston: Whispering Coyote Press, 1993.Charming and humorous presentation of a favourite song with additional verses added. Song included.

Trapani, Iza. Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star. Boston: Whispering Coyote Press, 1994. Verses are added to this traditional song to tell the story of a little girl who goes on a journey through space with a special star. Lovely illustrations. Song included.

Tyrrell, Frances. The Huron Carol. Toronto: Key Porter Books, 1990. Breathtaking illustrations beautifully complement this important Canadian story. A ‘must-have’ for any school or personal collection. Includes a history of the song. Song included.

Tyrrell, Frances. Woodland Christmas. Richmond Hill, Ontario: North Winds Press, 1995. This retelling of the classic “The Twelve Days of Christmas” features the creatures of the northern woodlands in each of the twelve days. Tyrrell’s watercolours are truly exquisite and leave my students spellbound. This treasure is a wonderful gift for adults and children! Song included.

Westcott, Nadine Bernard. I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1980. Works well. Clever illustrations. The junior children especially enjoy the humour. Song included.

Whatley, Bruce. The Teddy Bears’ Picnic. USA: Harper Collins Pub., 1996. Light and entertaining performance of this song, arranged and performed by Jerry Garcia and David Grisman. Banjo and guitar are featured, with other ‘Dixieland’ sounding accompaniment. Tape included.

KODály PEdagogy books

Bacon, Denise. 185 Unison Pentatonic Exercises. Newton, Massachusetts: Kodály Center of America, 1978.

_____. 50 Easy Two-Part Exercises. New York: European American Music Corporation, 1977.

Baird, Irene. Kodály I. Victoria, B.C.: Victoria Conservatory of Music, 1984.

Barron, John. Ride With Me. A Journey from Unison to Part-Singing.. Oakville, Ontario: Frederick Harris Music Co., Limited, 1993.

Choksy, Lois. The Kodály Method I: Comprehensive Music Education from Infant to Adult, Third Edition. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1999.

Choksy, Lois. The Kodály Method II: Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1999.

Choksy, Lois, Robert M. Abramson, Avon E. Gillespie, and David Woods. Teaching Music in the Twenty-First Century. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 2000.

Forrai, Katalin and Jean Sinor. Music in Preschool. Budapest: Corvina, 1988.

Hegyi, Erzsébet. Solfege According to the Kodály-Concept, Vol. 1 and Pupil’s Book. Kecskemét: Zoltán Kodály Pedagogical Institute of Music, 1975.

Hegyi, Erzsébet. Solfege According to the Kodály-Concept, Vol. II. Budapest: Editio Musica Budapest, 1979.

Hegyi, Erzsébet. Stylistic Knowledge on the Basis of the Kodály-Concept: Characteristics of Folk Music and Renaissance Style, Vol. 1 Advanced Level. Kecskemét: Zoltán Kodály Pedagogical Institute of Music, 1984.

Herboly, Ildikó. Teaching of Polyphony, Harmony and Form in Elementary School. Kecskemét: Zoltán Kodály Pedagogical Institute of Music, 1984.

Houlahan, Micheál and Philip Tacka. Sound Thinking: Music for Sight-Singing and Ear Training, 2 Vols. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1990.

Lantos, Edith. Bounce High, Bounce Low. Oakville, Ontario: Frederick Harris Music, 1988.

Sándor, Frigyes (Ed.). Musical Education in Hungary. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1969.

Szabó, Helga. The Kodály Concept of Music Education (English edition by Geoffrey Russell-Smith). London: Boosey & Hawkes, 1969.

Szönyi, Erzsébet. Kodály’s Principles in Practice (trans. John Weissman). London: Boosey & Hawkes, 1973.

Szönyi, Erzsébet. Musical Reading and Writing, Vol. 1, London: Boosey & Hawkes, 1974.

Vinden, David. Harmonic Foundations Through Relative Solfa, Part I. Wellesley, Massachusetts:Kodály Center of America, 1993.


Canadian song collections

Bartalus, Ilona. Sing, Silverbirch Sing. Toronto: Boosey & Hawkes, 1980.

Cass-Beggs, Barbara. Canadian Folk Songs for the Young. Vancouver, British Columbia: J.J. Douglas, 1975.

Fowke, Edith. The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs. Toronto: Penguin Books Canada, 1973.

_____. Sally Go Round the Sun. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1969.

_____. Ring Around the Moon. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart,, 1977.

Fowke, Edith (Ed.). Canadian Vibrations Canadiennes. Toronto: Macmillan, 1972.

Fowke, Edith and Alan Mills. Singing Our History: Canada’s Story in Song. Toronto: Doubleday, 1984.

Fowke, Edith and Richard Johnston. Folk Songs of Canada, Volumes I and II. Waterloo, Ontario: WaterlooMusic, 1954, 1978.

Johnston, Richard. Folk Songs North America Sings. Toronto: Kirby, 1984.

Panagapka, Jeannette and Laszlo Vikar. Songs of the North Woods as sung by O. J. Abbott and collected by Edith Fowke. Calgary: The University of Calgary Press, 2004.


Choral Collections of Folk Songs

Bacon, Denise. 46 Two-Part American Folk Songs for Elementary Grades. Kodály Center of America.

Barron, John (Ed.). Reflections of Canada (Pine Tree Gently Sigh, The Raftsmen, ‘Twas in the Moon of Wintertime, Reflets du Canada). Frederick Harris Music.

Cook, Donald F. Sing the Sea – 10 Songs from Newfoundland for Junior/Intermediate Choirs. Waterloo Music.

_____. Twelve Songs of Newfoundland – Creative Projects for Unison Choir and Classroom Instruments (Student Book and Teacher’s Guide). Waterloo Music.

Fowke, Edith and Richard Johnston. Folk Songs of Canada I and II, Choral Edition. Waterloo Music.
Goetze, Mary. Simply Sung – Folk Songs Arranged in Three Parts for Young Singers. Schott.

Karpeles, Maud and R. Vaughan Williams. Fifteen Folk-Songs from Newfoundland. Oxford University Press.

Szönyi, Erzsébet. Bicinia Americana – 22 Traditional American Children’s Songs (Two-Part). Boosey & Hawkes.

Tacka, Philip Tacka and Susan Taylor-Howell (Eds.). Sourwood Mountain – 28 North American and English Songs (Two Voices). Organization of American Kodály Educators.

Taylor-Howell, Susan (Ed.). The Owl Sings – 22 Folksongs Arranged for 2 or 3 Voices. Organization of American Kodály Educators.

Williams, Mark. Two-Part American Songs (Bicinia Americana). San Antonio, Texas: Southern Music, 1977.

_____. Two-Part American Songs (Bicinia Americana), Book Two. San Antonio, Texas: Southern Music, 1988.

Young, Alfred. Bicinia on European Songs, Set One and Two; Easy Bicinia on Known Songs, Set One and Two, Bicinia on American Songs, Set One and Two. Pro Canto Press.


World music song collections

Adzinyah, Maraire and Judith Cook Tucker. Let your Voice Be Heard! Songs from Ghana & Zimbabwe. Danbury, CT.: World Music Press, 1997 (revised edition). (Tape or CD included in set.) Call and response, multi-part and game songs, arranged and annotated for grades K-12. Each song includes music, pronunciations, translation explanation and notes on use. Suitable for junior, intermediate and high school, possibly. Very interesting and accessible. An excellent resource.

Burton, Bryan. Moving Within the Circle. Danbury, CT.: World Music Press, 1993. (Tape or CD included in set. Colour slides available.)This is a comprehensive book on Native American music and dance. It includes details about their instruments, the pronunciation and meaning of the text, oral music and percussion scores, and dance instruction. Burton immersed himself in various Native People’s culture, directly experiencing and learning their musical traditions which are carried out in the oral tradition. Recommendation: grade five and up.

Campbell, Patricia Shehan, Ellen McCullough-Brabson & Judith Cook Tucker, editors. Roots & Branches: A Legacy of Multicultural Music for Children. Danbury, Ct.: World Music Press, 1994. (Includes CD or tape.) A most credible collection of 38 refreshingly unfamiliar songs and games from 23 cultures. Includes hand and chant games, circle dances, lullabies, work songs and listening songs. Contributor biographies along with cultural overviews provide a “first-person” context for each selection. All selections on the CD are performed by the contributors in the original language. Photocopies permitted for educational use. Includes bibliography. Highly recommended.

Campbell, Patricia Shehan, Sue Williamson & Pierre Perron, editors. Traditional Songs of Singing Cultures: A World Sampler. USA.: Warner Bros. Publications, 1996. (Includes CD.) This excellent resource is the result of a project by the International Society for Music Education. It contains songs representing 13 different countries. Each entry includes a map, cultural information, information about the song, teaching suggestions and extensions and the melody written in staff notation. The song is performed on the CD by a musician of that culture. Photocopying of any kind is not permitted without permission.

Gesser, Samuel, editor. A Folksong Portrait of Canada. Markham, Ontario: PolyGram Group Canada Ltd., 1994. This Smithsonian-Folkways collection is probably the most authentic and credible collection available in Canada. The 3 CD set comes with extensive notes on the music and performers, along with text and translations. Especially intriguing is the large native peoples section. This gem is a definite must be in any folk song collection and very inexpensive.

Hampton, Walt. Hot Marimba! Zimbabwean-Style Music for Orff Instruments. Danbury, CT.: World Music Press, 1995. (Includes tape or CD.) Nine Zimbabwe-style pieces composed for Orff instruments by Walt Hampton, presented in order of ascending difficulty. The tape is very useful in establishing the rhythms. Exciting music sure to keep the interest of the group at a very high level!

Jones, Bessie and Bess Lomax Hawes. Step it Down. Athens, GA.: University of Georgia Press, Brown Thrasher Books, 1972. (Tape: Step it down, Games for Children by Bessie Jones. 1988 Rounder Records Corp. Rounder C-9004. Rounder Records, One Camp Street, Cambridge, MA., 02140.) A very interesting read and super source for games, songs and stories from the African- American heritage. Mrs. Jones’ ideas, stories and explanations are all in italics. Some patience is required for some of the written directions for games – but the tape helps and the outcome is well worth the effort.

Kerlee, Paul. Welcome in the Spring: Morris and Sword Dances for Children. Danbury, CT., World Music Press, 1996. (Book available on its own or as book and tape set.)The dance and music possibilities in the collection are exciting, especially for use in the junior and intermediate grades!

Libana. Fire Within. Durham, NC.: Ladyslipper Inc., 1990. (Tape available.) The music in this collection spans seven centuries and many different cultures. Musician Susan Robbins describes the music the best. “Running through this collection of music is a strength and quiet depth of heart, a reverence and mined vision toward individual and planetary peace. Two-thirds of these songs are rounds. Minimalist by nature, rounds create an exquisite circular motion for both the singer and the listener. Their repetitive, mantra-like phrasing facilitates a deeper, inner experience of emotion or allows a potent affirmation of a belief or image to occur. Singing rounds is also an inherently communal activity with each part holding equal importance within the whole.” An excellent resource.

May, Elizabeth. Music of Many Cultures. Berkeley, CA.: University of California Press, 1980. (Tapes included.)This is an excellent book for understanding the structure and style of the music used in a variety of countries and continents. It also provides information regarding how music is used in the culture. I would use this book with late primary and junior children. The text is difficult for students to read, but the maps, pictures [ie. of the instruments used] and tape would be great for them. It also gives a detailed bibliography, discography and list of related films.

Nettl, Bruno et.al. Excursions in World Music. New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc., 1992. (Tapes included.) Introduction to major musical traditions including India, the Middle East, Indonesia, Sub-Sahara Africa, and Latin America. Includes tapes of musical performances. Very useful for a unit of study, but too much information for general use.

Nyberg, Anders. Freedom is Coming: Songs of Protest and Praise from South Africa. Fort Lauderdale, Florida: Walton Music Corporation, 1984. (Tape available.) Some of the songs contained in this anthology of 15 songs of the blacks in South Africa will be familiar, such as ‘Siyahamba’ and ‘Freedom is Coming’. Although arranged for SATB voices, suggestions are given for 3-pt mixed choir, women’s choir, men’s choir and children’s choir. Detailed musical instructions help to ensure an authentic performance. In addition to a wonderful collection of songs, this book contains moving photos, drawings and quotations.


Dance and Movement Resources

Boorman, Joyce. Dance and Language Experiences with Children. Don Mills, Ontario: Longmans Canada, 1973.

_____. Creative Dance in the First Three Grades. Don Mills, Ontario: Longmans Canada, 1967.

_____. Creative Dance in Grades Four through Six. Don Mills, Ontario: Longmans Canada, 1971.

Chase, Richard. Singing Games and Playparty Games. New York: Dover, 1967 (1949).

Choksy, Lois and David Brummitt. 120 Singing Games and Dances for Elementary Schools. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1987.

Erdei, Peter. 150 American Folk Songs to Sing, Read and Play. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1974.

Forrai, Katalin and Jean Sinor. Music in Preschool. Budapest: Corvina, 1988.

Fowke, Edith. Sally Go Round the Sun: 300 Songs, Rhymes, and Games of Canadian Children.Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1969.

_____. Ring Around the Moon: 200 Songs, Tongue Twisters, Riddles and Rhymes of Canadian Children. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1977.

Fulton, Eleanor and Pat Smith. Let’s Slice the Ice: A Collection of Black Children’s Ring Games and Chants. Saint Louis, Mo.: Magnamusic-Baton, 1978.

Haselbach, Barbara. Improvisation, Dance and Movement. Translated by Margaret Murray. Saint Louis, Missouri: Magnamusic Baton, 1976.

_____. Dance Education: Basic principles and models for nursery and primary school. Translated by Margaret Murray. London: Schott, 1978.

Kenney, Maureen. Circle Round the Zero: Play Chants & Singing Games of City Children. Saint Louis, Mo.: Magnamusic-Baton, 1983.

Kerlee, Paul. Wake Up the Earth. Published privately.

_____. Son of Wake Up the Earth. Published privately.

Locke, Eleanor. Sail Away: 155 American Folk Songs to Sing, Read and Play. New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1988.

Newell, William Wells. Games and Songs of American Children. New York: Dover, 1963 (1883).

Opie, Iona & Peter. The Oxford Nursery Rhyme Book. London: Oxford University Press, 1987.

_____. The Singing Game. London: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Reeves, Harriet R. Song and Dance Activities for Elementary Children. West Nyack, N.Y: Parker Publishing Co., 1985.

Rohrbough, Lynn. Handy Play Party Book. Burnsville, North Carolina: World Around Songs, 1940 (revised by Cecilia Riddle, 1982).

Trinka, Jill. Folk Songs, Singing Games and Play Parties 1, 2, 3.

Weikart, Phyllis S. Movement Plus Music: Activities for Children Ages 3 to 7. Ypsilanti, Michigan:High/Scope Press, 1985.

_____. Movement Plus Rhymes, Songs and Singing Games. Ypsilanti, Michigan: High/Scope Press, 1988.

_____. Round the Circle: Key Experiences in Movement for Children Ages 3 to 5. Ypsilanti, Michigan:High/Scope Press, 1987.

_____. Teaching Movement & Dance: A Sequential Approach to Rhythmic Movement. Ypsilanti, Michigan: High/Scope Press, 1982.

Wood, Donna. Move, Sing, Listen, Play. Toronto: Gordon V. Thompson, 1982.




 
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Video

 
 

VIDEO RESOURCEs

1. TEACHING IDEAS

Here are some ideas for your classroom

 This video shows Martha Healey (KSC registrar) teaching participants at the AKA Singposium in February the Nova Scotian folksong/singing game “Bog Down in the Valley.”  This is a singing game easily taught to elementary students. Take a look!

 

2. TEACHER TRAINING:

Find out what students taking a summer course do! Below are the Kodaly Institute Informance videos at University of Victoria, British Columbia. The videos includes a demonstration of the work achieved during a two week course in pedagogy, music literature, musicianship, conducting and choir.

University of Victoria Kodaly Summer Institute 2013 INFORMANCE

University of Victoria Kodaly Summer Institute 2014 INFORMANCE

University of Victoria Kodaly Summer Institute 2015 INFORMANCE

 
 
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Publishers

 
 

Prentice-Hall Canada Inc.
1870 Birchmount Road
Scarborough, Ontario,
M1P 2J7

Pro Canto Press
7 Brady Road
Westborough, MA 01581
508-836-3753
Email:  ProCantoPress@charter.net

Revels Inc.
One Kendall Sq., Bldg. 600,
Cambridge, MA
2139
Tel: (617)621-0505.,
E-mail: revels@tiac.net

Schott/Magnamusic Baton (MMB)
P.O. Box 32410
10370 Page Industrial Boulevard
Saint Louis, Missouri
63132

Southern Music Company
1248 Austin Highway, Suite 212
San Antonio, Texas
78209 U.S.A.

Gordon V. Thompson Music
29 Birch Avenue
Toronto, Ontario,
M4V 1E2

World Around Songs, Inc.
Rt. 5, Box 398
Burnsville,
North Carolina
28714

Zoltán Kodály Pedagogical Institute of Music
Distributed by Capital University Bookstore

Recommended Publishers for Choral Music

Boddington Music Ltd./
St. John’s Music
1650 Avenue Road, Toronto, Ontario M5M 3Y1 – Tel: (416) 785-5000, 1-800-387-8575

Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.
52 Cooper Square,10th Floor, New York, NY 10003-7102
Phone: 212-979-1090, Fax: 212-979-7056, Email: bhpromo@ny.boosey.com

Canadian Choral Centre Inc.
380 – 550 Century Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3H 0Y1 – Tel: (204) 786-6758 or 1-800-665-8995

Carl Fischer, Inc.

Choristers Guild
2834 West Kingsley Road, Garland, Texas 75041

Concordia Publishing House
3358 South Jefferson Avenue, Saint Louis, Missouri 63118

Cypress Choral Music – 1702-1408 Strathmore Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 3A9

Earthsongs
220 NW 29th Street, Corvallis, Oregon 97330

Frederick Harris Music Company Ltd.
Unit 1, 5865 McLaughlin Rd., Mississauga, ON L5R 1B8

Gordon V. Thompson Music
29 Birch Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M4V 1E2

Harold Flammer, Inc.
Delaware Water Gap, Pennsylvania 18327

Hinshaw Music, Inc.
P.O. Box 470, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514

Hysen Music Ltd.
146 Dundas Street, London, Ontario N6A 1G1 – Tel: (519) 433-6173 – Fax: (519) 645-1762

Lenel Music Publishing
P.O. Box 35427, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6M 4G8

Leslie Music Supply   Box 471, Oakville, Ontario, L6J 5A8

Mark Foster Music Co.
Box 4012, Champaign, Illinois 61820

McGroarty Music Publishing Co.
241 McRae Drive, Toronto, Ontario, M4G 1T7

Neil A. Kjos Music Co.
P.O. Box 178270, San Diego, CA 92177-8270 – Tel: (858) 270-9800

Northwest Musical Services
1991 Main Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5T 3C1 – Tel: (604) 877-1991 or 1-800-663-6797

Oxford University Press
70 Wynford Drive, Don Mills, Ontario, M3C 1J9

Plymouth Music Co., Inc.
170 N.E. 33rd Street, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33334

Pro Canto Press
7 Brady Road, Westborough, MA 01581 – Tel: 508-836-3753 – Email:  ProCantoPress@charter.net

Rideau Music Ltd.
110 – 11th Avenue SW, Calgary, Alberta, T2R 0B8 – Tel: (403) 261-5916 or 1-800-661-6874

Royal School of Church Music
Cleveland Lodge, Westhumble, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6BW  UK

Stuart D. Beaudoin
629 Queen Street, Newmarket, Ontario, L3Y 2J1

The Choral Store
241 McRae Drive, Toronto, Ontario M4G 1T7-Tel: (416) 422-4065 or 1-800-624-2748

Walton Music Corp.
PO Box 167, Bynum, NC,  27228 – Tel: 1-800-554-0626

PUBLISHERS

Alfred Publishing
15335 Morrison Street
Sherman Oaks, California
91403

Amsco Publications
A Division of Music Sales Corporation
24 East 22nd Street
New York, New York
10010

August House, Inc.
P.O. Box 3223
Little Rock, Arkansas
72203

The Avondale Press
Box 451
Willowdale, Ontario,
L3P 3J3

Belwin Mills (CCP/Belwin, Inc.)
15800 N.W. 48th Avenue
Miami, Florida
33014

Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.
52 Cooper Square,10th Floor,
New York, NY
10003-7102
Phone: 212-979-1090,
Fax: 212-979-7056, Email: bhpromo@ny.boosey.com

Breakwater Books
100 Water Street
P.O. Box 2188
St. John’s, Newfoundland,
A1C 6E6

Canyon Press, Inc.
Box 1235
Cincinnati, Ohio
5201

Capital University Bookstore
2199 East Main Street
Columbus, Ohio
43209-2394

Choristers Guild
12404 Park Central Drive, Suite 100
Dallas, TX 75251-1802

Corvina
Distributed by Boosey & Hawkes

Doubleday Canada Ltd.
105 Bond Street
Toronto, Ontario,
M5B 1Y3

Dover Publications
General Publishing Co. Ltd
39 Lesmill Road
Don Mills, Ontario, M3B 2T6

Editio Musica Budapest
Distributed by Boosey & Hawkes

Formac Publishing Company Ltd.
5502 Atlantic Street
Halifax, Nova Scotia,
B3H 1G4

David R. Godine, Publisher, Inc.
306 Dartmouth Street
Boston, Massachusetts
02116

Goose Lane Editions
469 King Street
Fredericton, New Brunswick,
E3B 1E5

Hancock House
19313 Zero Avenue
Surrey, British Columbia,
V4P 1M7

Frederick Harris Music Company Ltd.

High/Scope Press
High/Scope Educational Research Foundation
600 North River Street
Ypsilanti, Michigan
48198

Hinshaw Music, Inc.
P.O. Box 470
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
27514

International Kodály Society
Budapest
P.O. Box 8 / H-1502
Distributed by Capital University Bookstore
E.C. Kerby Ltd.
198 Davenport Road
Toronto, Ontario,
M5R 1J2

Kodály Center of America
15 Denton Road
Wellesley, Massachusetts
02181

Ladyslipper, Inc.
P.O. Box 3124
Durham, North Carolina
27715

Libana, Inc.
P.O. Box 530
Cambridge, Massachusetts
02140

Lorenz Publishing Co.
501 East Third Street
Dayton, Ohio
45401-0802

Maxwell Macmillan Canada
1200 Eglinton Avenue East
Suite 200
Don Mills, Ontario
M3C 3N1

McClelland & Stewart
The Canadian Publishers
481 University Avenue, Suite 900
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M5G 2E9

McFarland & Company, Inc.
Box 611
Jefferson, North Carolina
29640

National Association for Music Education
1806 Robert Fulton Drive
Reston, Virginia
22091

New Canada Publications
A Division of NC Press Ltd.
Box 4010, Station A
Toronto, Ontario,
M5H 1H8

Organization of American Kodály Educators
823 Old Westtown Road
West Chester, Pennsylvania
19382

Oxford University Press
70 Wynford Drive
Don Mills, Ontario,
M3C 1J9

Parker Publishing Co.
Distributed by Prentice-Hall Canada

Penguin Books Canada Ltd.
10 Alcorn Avenue
Suite 300
Toronto, Ontario,
M4V 3B2

Perry Publications, Inc.
P.O. Box 204
Whitewater, Wisconsin
53190


 
 
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Clinician Directory

 
 

Download the 2019 KSC Clinician Directory here.

 
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Kodály quotes

 
 

kodály quotes

The following “Kodaly” quotations were compiled by KSC board member Connie Foss More, from The Selected Writings of Zoltan Kodaly, Boosey & Hawkes, 1974.  They affirm the importance of the work of music educators. When you’ve had a frustrating or tiring day … read and enjoy!

p. 148:  Let us take our children seriously! Everything else follows from this…only the best is good enough for a child. (1941)

p. 151:  And I would advise my young colleagues, the composers of symphonies, to drop in sometimes at the kindergarten, too.  It is there that it is decided whether there will be anybody to understand their works in twenty years’ time.  (1957)

p. 126:  That the economic crisis is the cause of everything?  Everything will be set right as soon as the economy is in order?  I do not think so.  Penury may hamper development but wealth does not always promote it either.  Money does not produce ideas.  Anyhow, there would be sufficient money here if only it were always spent on what is needed.  However, the most valuable things cannot be bought with money.  The greatest trouble is not the emptiness of the purse but the emptiness of the soul.  And of this we have got more than our share.  (1929)

p. 127:  We put up the fancy spires first.  When we saw that the whole edifice was shaky, we set to building the walls.  We have still to make a cellar.  This has been the situation, particularly in our musical culture. If in 1875 instead of establishing the Academy of Music, we had laid the foundations for the teaching of singing in schools, today’s musical culture would be greater and more general. (1941; 1957)

p. 124:  It is much more important who the singing master at Kisvarda (small village) is than who the director of the Opera House is, because a poor director will fail.  (Often even a good one.)  But a bad teacher may kill of the love of music for thirty years from thirty classes of pupils. (1929)

p. 197:  The characteristics of a good musician can be summarized as follows:

1.  A well-trained ear
2.  A well-trained intelligence
3.  A well-trained heart
4.  A well-trained hand.

All four must develop together, in constant equilibrium.  As soon as one lags behind or rushes ahead, there is something wrong.  So far most of you have met only the requirement of the fourth point:  the training of your fingers has left the rest far behind.    You would have achieved the same results more quickly and easily, however, if your training in the other three had kept pace. (1954)

p. 145:  To write a folksong is as much beyond the bounds of possibility as to write a proverb.  Just as proverbs condense centuries of popular wisdom and observation, so,  in traditional songs, the emotions of centuries are immortalized in a form polished to perfection.  (1941)

p. 122:  Let us stop the teachers’ superstition according to which only some diluted art-substitute is suitable for teaching purposes.  A child is the most susceptible and the most enthusiastic audience for pure art; for in every great artist the child is alive – and this is something felt by youth’s congenial spirit. Conversely, only art of intrinsic value is suitable for children!  Everything else is harmful.  After all, food is more carefully chosen for an infant than for an adult.  Musical nourishment which is “rich in vitamins” is essential for children. (1929)

p. 206:  If one were to attempt to express the essence of this education in one word, it could only be –singing.  ….Our age of mechanization leads along a road ending with man himself as a machine; only the spirit of singing can save us from this fate.  …. It is our firm conviction that mankind will live the happier when it has learnt to live with music more worthily.  Whoever works to promote this end, in one way or another, has not lived in vain.  (1966)

p. 120:  Teach music and singing at school in such a way that it is not a torture but a joy for the pupil; instill a thirst for finer music in him, a thirst which will last for a lifetime.  Music must not be approached from its intellectual, rational side, nor should it be conveyed to the child as a system of algebraic symbols, or as the secret writing of a language with which he has no connection.  The way should be paved for direct intuition. …..  Often a single experience will open the young soul to music for a whole lifetime.  This experience cannot be left to chance; it is the duty of the school to provide it. (1929)

p. 46:  Children’s singing games allow a more profound insight than anything else into the primeval age of folk music.  Singing connected with movements and action is a much more ancient, and, at the same time, more complex phenomenon than is a simple song. …. In the same way as the child’s development repeats in brief the evolution of mankind, his forms of music represent a history of music; indeed they afford a glimpse into the prehistoric period of music.  From the reiteration of the smallest motif, comprising but a couple of notes, we can observe all grades of musical development up to the average stage of the European folksong… Here the child’s music often touches that of adults.  (1951)

p. 161-162:  Nobody wants to stop at pentatony.  But, indeed, the beginnings must be made there; on the one hand, in this way the child’s biogenetical development is natural and, on the other, this is what is demanded by a rational pedagogical sequence. ……Pentatony is an introduction to world literature:  it is the key to many foreign musical literatures, from the ancient Gregorian chant, through China to Debussy.  (1947)

p. 221:  Nowadays it is no longer necessary to explain why it is better to start teaching music to small children through pentatonic tunes:  first, it is easier to sing in tune without having to use semitones (half-steps), second, the musical thinking and the ability to sound the notes can develop better using tunes which employ leaps rather than stepwise tunes based on the diatonic scale often used by teachers.  (1947)

p. 204:  We should read music in the same way that an educated adult will read a book:  in silence, but imagining the sound.  (1954)

p. 196:  Today there is much talk of overburdening the students. It is true that the musician finds burdensome the learning of subjects whose direct use in his career he cannot see.  If he realized, however, how much easier it is to learn every music subject, and how much time is won if he first trains himself to be a quick and sure reader, he would not rest day or night until he had achieved this.  To teach a child an instrument without first giving him preparatory training and without developing singing, reading and dictating to the highest level along with the playing is to build upon sand.  (1953).

p. 199:  Real art is one of the most powerful forces in the rise of mankind, and he who renders it accessible to as many people as possible is a benefactor of humanity.  (1954)